Tajiri Kenichi

Ninth death sentence handed down by mixed jurors. Defendant voluntarily confessed to first murder after being interrogated for second.

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TOKYO — Japan executed a death row inmate Friday, the Justice Ministry said in announcing the 17th execution in about four years since Prime Minister Shinzo Abe returned to power in December 2012.


The ministry said Kenichi Tajiri, 45, was hanged for killing two women in two murder-robbery cases in Kumamoto, southwestern Japan. The latest execution is the second involving an inmate who was sentenced to death in a lay judge trial. Japan’s lay judge system, in which three professional and six lay judges hear a case, began in 2009.

This was the first execution ordered by Justice Minister Katsutoshi Kaneda since he assumed his post in August, with the number of death row inmates in Japan now standing at 128.

“This is an extremely cruel case in which the precious lives of the victims were taken for selfish purposes,” Kaneda told a press conference, adding he gave the order after careful consideration.

According to the finalized ruling, Tajiri killed Chizuko Nakatsu, 49, during a robbery in Uto, Kumamoto Prefecture, in March 2004, in which he stole about 180,000 yen in cash, and murdered Yoshiko Migita, 65, and seriously injured her husband during a robbery in Kumamoto city in February 2011 in which he stole about 100,000 yen.

The justice minister said in an interview shortly after he took office that the issue of the death penalty needs to be handled carefully as it involves the taking of human life, but also noted that court judgments must be strictly carried out in a nation governed by law.

Kaneda’s predecessor as justice minister, Mitsuhide Iwaki, ordered four executions in the 10 months he was in office, including that of the first person to be convicted in a capital punishment case that went before lay judges.

In October, the Japan Federation of Bar Associations issued a declaration proposing the abolition of the death penalty by 2020 for the first time as the organization.

Source:
Japan Today, November 11, 2016

Man sentenced to death for killing 2 women, stealing cash

(Mainichi Japan) October 26, 2011

TOKYO (Kyodo) -- The Kumamoto District Court sentenced a 40-year-old man to death Tuesday for killing two women and stealing money in separate incidents in Kumamoto Prefecture in 2004 and 2011.

This was the ninth death sentence handed down by a panel of three professional and six lay judges since citizens joined trials of heinous crimes such as murder, robbery and rape in 2009.

According to the ruling Kenichi Tajiri, a resident of Kumamoto, murdered Chizuko Nakatsu, then 49, and stole about 180,000 yen in cash after he broke into her house in Uto in March 2004.

And this past February, Tajiri murdered Yoshiko Migita, then 65, and seriously injured her husband Koji, 72, at their home in Kumamoto, and stole about 100,000 in cash, according to the ruling.

Tajiri had pleaded guilty to the robbery-murder charges, while prosecutors had sought the death penalty.

In the decision, Presiding Judge Hiroyoshi Suzuki said there were no grounds for leniency as Tajiri had repeated a similar crime seven years after the first murder.

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2人殺害の被告に死刑判決 熊本地裁の裁判員裁判


 民家2軒に押し入り、2人を殺害、1人に重傷を負わせたとして強盗殺人などの罪に問われた熊本市城南町丹生宮(にうのみや)、無職田尻賢一被告(40)の裁判員裁判で、熊本地裁は25日、求刑通り死刑判決を言い渡した。
 鈴木浩美裁判長は「酌量すべき一切の事情を考慮したが、極刑をもって臨むほかない」と述べた。裁判員裁判で死刑判決は9例目。被告は起訴内容を認め、量刑が最大の争点だった。
 判決は、死刑が許されるとして最高裁が1983年に示した「永山基準」にほぼ沿って量刑を検討。動機について、借金返済に充てるため、一度に大金を手に入れようとしたと認定。「酌量の余地は全くない」と指摘した。
 犯行の様子は、ぜんそくの発作を装うなどして被害者宅の玄関を開けさせたうえ、繰り返し凶器で攻撃した点を重視。「極めて執拗(しつよう)かつ冷酷で、残虐さが際立っている」と非難した。
 田尻被告は2件目の事件の2日後に出頭し、その後の調べで、7年前の強盗殺人事件を自供。弁護側は自首が成立すると主張し、死刑回避を求めていたが、判決は、取調官に余罪の取り調べを受けて「もうごまかせない」との思いからの自供だと認定。自首の成立を否定した。
 判決によると、田尻被告は2月、熊本市渡鹿2丁目の会社役員宅で妻(当時65)の首や胸をナイフで多数回突き刺して殺害。現金約10万円などを奪い、帰宅した役員の腹も刺して重傷を負わせた。2004年3月には熊本県宇土市走潟町の医師宅で妻(当時49)の頭や顔をスパナで何度も殴り、胸を包丁で刺して殺害し、約18万円を強奪した


TOKYO — Japan executed a death row inmate Friday, the Justice Ministry said in announcing the 17th execution in about four years since Prime Minister Shinzo Abe returned to power in December 2012.


The ministry said Kenichi Tajiri, 45, was hanged for killing two women in two murder-robbery cases in Kumamoto, southwestern Japan. The latest execution is the second involving an inmate who was sentenced to death in a lay judge trial. Japan’s lay judge system, in which three professional and six lay judges hear a case, began in 2009.

This was the first execution ordered by Justice Minister Katsutoshi Kaneda since he assumed his post in August, with the number of death row inmates in Japan now standing at 128.

“This is an extremely cruel case in which the precious lives of the victims were taken for selfish purposes,” Kaneda told a press conference, adding he gave the order after careful consideration.

According to the finalized ruling, Tajiri killed Chizuko Nakatsu, 49, during a robbery in Uto, Kumamoto Prefecture, in March 2004, in which he stole about 180,000 yen in cash, and murdered Yoshiko Migita, 65, and seriously injured her husband during a robbery in Kumamoto city in February 2011 in which he stole about 100,000 yen.

The justice minister said in an interview shortly after he took office that the issue of the death penalty needs to be handled carefully as it involves the taking of human life, but also noted that court judgments must be strictly carried out in a nation governed by law.

Kaneda’s predecessor as justice minister, Mitsuhide Iwaki, ordered four executions in the 10 months he was in office, including that of the first person to be convicted in a capital punishment case that went before lay judges.

In October, the Japan Federation of Bar Associations issued a declaration proposing the abolition of the death penalty by 2020 for the first time as the organization.

Source:
Japan Today, November 11, 2016